EFFICACY OF SOME SANITIZING AGENTS ON SALMONELLA SPECIES DETECTED IN RINSED WATER OF VEGETABLES EATEN RAW IN SAMARU, ZARIA

Authors

  • Maikaji, F. S. National Animal Production Research Institute, Ahmadu Bello University, Shika-Zaria,
  • Inabo, H. I. Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria.
  • Bale, J. O. O. National Animal Production Research Institute, Ahmadu Bello University, Shika-Zaria,
  • Chiezey, N. P. National Animal Production Research Institute, Ahmadu Bello University, Shika-Zaria,
  • Samuel, F. U. National Animal Production Research Institute, Ahmadu Bello University, Shika-Zaria,
  • Bello, T. K. National Animal Production Research Institute, Ahmadu Bello University, Shika-Zaria,
  • Hassan, R. National Animal Production Research Institute, Ahmadu Bello University, Shika-Zaria,

Abstract

Food-borne infection is one of the major disease outbreaks in developing countries most
especially those cause by enteric pathogens like Salmonella species. The study was set out to
examine the effects of vinegar, common salt and potash as sanitizers at different concentrations
and exposure time on Salmonella species. Samples used include; carrots (10), cabbage (10) and
lettuce (10). The results indicated that out of the thirty (30) samples collected, Salmonella typhi
were isolated from 4 carrot, 2 cabbage and 3 lettuce samples. While 1,3 and 2 are from carrot,
cabbage and lettuce samples respectively yielded other types of unidentified Salmonella species.
The number of colonies formed by Salmonella species significantly decrease with increase in
vinegar concentration and exposure time. Vinegar was found to be the most potent sanitizer
followed by common salt while potash (white) had the slowest effect on Salmonella species.
Therefore, washing vegetables with vinegar solution is advisable because it helps in minimizing
potential health risk that could affect eating raw vegetables since the use of potable water for
vegetable farming is difficult, even though is strongly suitable. Nevertheless, there is clear need
of enlightenment to vegetable sellers on post-harvest handling, purposely to cut down the degree of contamination.

Published

2015-12-30