EFFECT OF VELVET BEAN PHENOLS ON DIETARY POLYPHENOL RETENTION AND PERFORMANCE OF WISTAR RATS

Authors

  • G. I. O. Odafe-Shalome Department of Biochemistry, faculty of Life Science, University of Benin, Benin-City, Nigeria
  • I. O. Onoagbe Department of Biochemistry, faculty of Life Science, University of Benin, Benin-City, Nigeria

Keywords:

Velvet bean, Soybean, Polyphenols, Growth, Wistar rats

Abstract

Four test diets based on untreated (UVB), autoclaved (AVB), roasted (RVB) and cooked (CVB) velvet beans, Mucuna sloaneivar. NPRI, and two standard diets based on soybean (SBM) and casein (CAS) were fed to weanling wistar rats in a 6x4 CBD for 36 days. The aim was to determine the faecal and urinal excretion of endogenous polyphenols from the bean; to examine body retention levels and the effect of this on growth. The group of rats fed UVB-diet, retained 51.4% of the 8.74g of VB-polyphenols ingested through feed; while 0.21g polyphenol was egested as component of faeces and 4.24g was excreted in the urine. The groups fed AVB and RVB-diets voided much of the dietary polyphenols in their faeces and urine, retaining much less in body tissue (8.13% and 1.82% respectively) while animal growth was hampered. Significantly higher but similar fractions of ingested polyphenols were retained in treatment groups fed CVB-diet (29.6%) and SBM-diet (22.1%) while animal growth was not hampered. There were no symptoms of toxicity observed for any treatment group. The control group fed SBN-diet recorded the best animal performance among all the treatments. This was followed by the trial group fed CVB-diet, which recorded significantly (p< 0.05) higher performance indices than other processed VB-diets. This suggested that cooking is the best method of heat treatment to improve its nutritional value.  Increasing the cooking duration for velvet bean is hence recommended as a means to further reduce or eliminate the endogenous polyphenols, in order to achieve further improvement in animal performance.

Published

2020-06-30