PERFORMANCE OF BROILER CHICKENS FED DIETS CONTAINING KIDNEY BEAN (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) SEEDS SUBJECTED TO VARIOUS PROCESSING METHODS

Authors

  • Damang, P. J. Plateau State College of Agriculture, Garkawa
  • Tuleun, C. D.
  • Oluremi, O. I. A.
  • Carew, S. N.

Keywords:

kidney beans, processing methods, broiler chickens

Abstract

A study was conducted to determine how kidney beans may best be utilized in the diets of broiler chickens. The kidney beans were procured and subjected to various processing methods, namely, sun-drying (raw seeds), boiling, toasting, fermenting and sprouting. The seeds from each processing method were used to compound feeds for broiler chickens at both starter and finisher phases. Another feed without kidney beans was made, which served as a control diet; it contained only the conventional protein feedstuffs (groundnut cake and soyabeans). The diets were iso-caloric and iso-nitrogenous. Three hundred and sixty (360) day-old broiler chicks of the strain, Cobb, were weighed and randomly distributed to the dietary treatments with 60 birds per treatment and 15 per replicate. There were six dietary treatments replicated four times in a completely randomized design. Weighed quantities of feeds were supplied to each replicate group at the beginning of each week. Left-over feeds were weighed at the end of the week and deducted from the feed supplied to determine the feed intake for the week. Data taken included feed intake and body weight; from where other parameters such as weight gain, feed-to-gain ratio, protein efficiency ratio and feed cost per kilogramme gain, were computed. At the end of the starter phase, the birds were fed a common diet, which did not contain kidney beans, for 7 days to remove the effect of the starter phase and to prepare them for the finisher phase. The data collection at the starter phase was repeated during the finisher phase. The starter and finisher phases lasted four weeks each. The feed intake of the starter broiler chicks fed boiled kidney bean diet (1739.25g) was significantly (P<0.01) higher than 1605.00g and 1546.25g for those fed fermented and toasted kidney bean diets, respectively. The feed intake of the birds fed boiled and fermented kidney bean diets were significantly (P<0.01) higher than 1524.00g for those fed the control diet. The weight gains of the birds fed boiled, toasted and fermented kidney bean diets 876.45g, 834.20g and 869.70g, respectively, did not differ significantly but were significantly (P<0.01) higher than 703.20g for those fed the control diet. During the finisher phase, the feed intake of the birds fed boiled, toasted and fermented kidney bean diets (4394.80g, 4302.80g and 4303.80g, respectively), were significantly (P<0.01) higher than 4194.00g for those fed the control diet. The weight gains of the birds fed boiled and fermented kidney bean diets did not differ significantly from each other and from the value for those fed the control diet. Boiling, toasting and fermentation of the dietary kidney beans resulted to weight gains in broiler chickens that were superior to the control treatment at both starter and finisher phases. Therefore, boiling, toasting or fermentation is recommended for processing kidney beans for inclusion in the diets of broiler chickens.

Published

2017-06-30